Weatherstrip glass seals - muley method

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Re: Weatherstrip glass seals - muley method

Postby dapinky » Sun 23.07.2017, 17:01

Phil,

thanks for the link - but as you know, I'm a cheapskate bodger :D

(I just use cheapo superglue and sprinkle baking powder on/into the liquid as a 'filler' - lots of stuff on Youtube about it, and the chemistry behind it)...

... the chemistry is the same, and a lot cheaper :wink:

The problem I have found is that cyanoacrylate, by it's chemical definition, doesn't work on everything and if there are any contaminants on the surfaces, it's not always easy to get a permanent bond. As with many things, less is more... if the layer of glue is too thick, it tends to suffer from chemical shear and basically 'snap'.... many people see it as a failure of the glue, and it's ability to bond to the surface, but the surface bond isn't the bit that breaks. The molecules stick to the surface far better than to each other.

I tend to only use it on freshly-broken bits with a clean and easily positioned repair - otherwise, a small dab to hold it in place and surround the repair with something suitable to keep it there.
Dave

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go on - click this link - you know you want to!
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Re: Weatherstrip glass seals - muley method

Postby lotusflasherman » Sun 23.07.2017, 20:32

dapinky wrote:Phil,

thanks for the link - but as you know, I'm a cheapskate bodger :D

(I just use cheapo superglue and sprinkle baking powder on/into the liquid as a 'filler' - lots of stuff on Youtube about it, and the chemistry behind it)...

... the chemistry is the same, and a lot cheaper :wink:

The problem I have found is that cyanoacrylate, by it's chemical definition, doesn't work on everything and if there are any contaminants on the surfaces, it's not always easy to get a permanent bond. As with many things, less is more... if the layer of glue is too thick, it tends to suffer from chemical shear and basically 'snap'.... many people see it as a failure of the glue, and it's ability to bond to the surface, but the surface bond isn't the bit that breaks. The molecules stick to the surface far better than to each other.

I tend to only use it on freshly-broken bits with a clean and easily positioned repair - otherwise, a small dab to hold it in place and surround the repair with something suitable to keep it there.


Well I'm a cheapskate too but I'll pay a few extra pence for something if it gives value for money... and using 'baking powder' makes me laugh - can you get black baking powder?

My Dad 'cornered the market' in School Prizes at Bridgnorth Grammer School in 1933 & 1934 and one of the books I inherited is '300 Things A Bright Can Do'. All sorts of interesting things to do with baking powder (Sodium Bicarbonate), moth balls (naphthalene) and other household chemicals. Also has build a 'cat's whisker radio' and build your own steam engine but the 'take a small lump of phosphorous' seems a bit tricky these days... :lol:

I do find superglue expensive to use ... I buy a tube, use a couple of blobs, put it away. Next time it's gone solid so I buy a tube... etc, etc, (and I'm not inferring Q-bond will be any better)
Phil

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Re: Weatherstrip glass seals - muley method

Postby dapinky » Sun 23.07.2017, 22:40

We're going well :offtopic: with this, but suffice to say, Q-bond is still *just* a cyanoacrylate glue with additives to give it colour and consistency.....

.... basically, it's all just the same stuff with different things thrown in to the mix to 'brand' it.

I tend to buy generic stuff in small containers - as you say, use it once and chuck it away (my local cheapo shop sells a pack of 10 tiny tubes for a quid - can't say fairer than that!)
Dave

Just the one now, but this one's mine! - and it will be finished eventually.....

go on - click this link - you know you want to!
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