Justin's I.B.10

Moderators: theelanman, dapinky, GeoffSmith, Dave Eds, DaveT, Elanlover, muley, Nige, Enright, nitroman, algirdas, Sy V, Specky, clemo

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Sun 01.09.2019, 11:04

Thanks John

I agreed with the Mrs she’ll take the wheel in tomorrow. Took the wheel off the car and looked closer at the screw. Looked a relatively short one in the deepest part of the thread so screwed it out. I’ve sprayed soapy water on the hole and there’s no air leakage. Would you guys go with that? I was expecting the tire to go down and for me to get a shop to repair it from the inside out....
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby Fredjohn » Sun 01.09.2019, 11:55

Given where it is, the method of repair is to plug it from the outside using a rubber plug with a head. The head is pushed in first which then "locks" itself inside the tyre (note it's spelt with a "y" over here!)

It is all bonded in with rubber cement and the excess tail cut off. About 10-15 mins work. Get down to most tyre outlets and they''ll do it. Although as your hole doesn't go all the way through, I'm not sure what they would do other than actually pushing the hole through.


As far as beam deflectors are concerned, I just use Halfords ones. Single use, £7.99: more expensive than your Amazon choice but I know what I am getting. Comes with full instructions for virtually every car/headlamp lens design available/suitable.


I've taken mine to Europe several times with no real issues. I just took basic tools and AA or = 5 star cover. I used to carry a full size spare as Phil suggests, but removed the skinny one to keep boot space available for 2 up touring.


Enjoy the trip and don't worry too much, it'll be fine :burnout: :burnout:
La vie passe vite: vivez la avec elan(s).

Elan S4 DHC 1969
Elan SE turbo 1992
MB CLK 320CDi 2007
Boardman Endurance SLR 9.4 disc carbon road bike
Evora 2010
Swift Sundance Lifestyle 500
User avatar
Fredjohn
God
 
Posts: 1770
Joined: Tue 21.08.2012, 00:30
Location: Malvern, Worcs

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby lotusflasherman » Sun 01.09.2019, 17:26

Fredjohn wrote:Given where it is, the method of repair is to plug it from the outside using a rubber plug with a head. The head is pushed in first which then "locks" itself inside the tyre (note it's spelt with a "y" over here!)

It is all bonded in with rubber cement and the excess tail cut off. About 10-15 mins work.


I also carry a DIY kit for plugging holes in tyres - first saw them in a motorcycle shop but are on ebay for all applications now, for less than £5. Seems more sense than squirting goo in the valve, which is only a get you home fix anyway, but I have not had need to use it so far.

The Evora has different wheels front to rear so no spare and is supplied with a can of Holts Tyreweld. That says it is only 'get you home' and '30mph should not be exceeded'. My Evora also has the optional Tyre Pressure Monitoring System that shows pressures on the dash and alarms when they start to drop. A set of winter wheels I bought had one valve sensor not working because it was full of goo and I found out how expensive a replacement is...
therefore I am not a fan of the cans of goo, like some are. Each to their own.

If the screw is only in a tread block and has not penetrated the carcass I would ignore it. I've frequently dug out a flint chip that appears to leave a hole but hole seems to disappear when the tyre has got hot. I thought you meant the screw was right through.

An alternative strategy for continental travel that I considered was to carry a spare tyre, anticipating that it should be fairly easy and cheap to find somewhere to fit and balance it.
Phil

Leave me alone, I think I know what I'm doing.
Cars: Subaru Forester 2.5XTN, Eclat Riviera, brace of Pacific Blue SE's, Collapso SE, Elan+S.... and now an Evora
User avatar
lotusflasherman
God
 
Posts: 2331
Joined: Fri 05.09.2008, 00:14
Location: Hadleigh, 15m west of Ipswich or 800 miles south (Cap d'Agde)

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby wayne » Mon 02.09.2019, 06:05

[quote="Fredjohn"]Given where it is, the method of repair is to plug it from the outside using a rubber plug with a head. The head is pushed in first which then "locks" itself inside the tyre (note it's spelt with a "y" over here!)

It is all bonded in with rubber cement and the excess tail cut off. About 10-15 mins work. Get down to most tyre outlets and they''ll do it. Although as your hole doesn't go all the way through, I'm not sure what they would do other than actually pushing the hole through.

quote]

I thought these were made illegal donkeys years ago? I've only ever had 1 puncture repaired on my Elan and first place I went to offered me this method, I kindly refused and found somewhere else that offered an internal patch with a rubber plug that they pulled through from the inside and cut off.

I'll never use the repair kit that came with my Evora. The recommendation is that you need to replace the Tyre pressure monitor unit after use?
Tow trucks are fortunately really cheap here £10 - £20, much cheaper than a new TPMS unit.
1992 Pacific Blue, Top end performance Kit. K&N airfilter& HKS BOV. Everest. HiSpec fronts, SS hoses. 2010 Canyon red Evora.
http://www.elanm100.com
User avatar
wayne
God
 
Posts: 794
Joined: Fri 12.09.2003, 00:38
Location: Bahrain

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby GeoffSmith » Mon 02.09.2019, 10:15

lotusflasherman wrote:I also carry a DIY kit for plugging holes in tyres - first saw them in a motorcycle shop but are on ebay for all applications now, for less than £5. Seems more sense than squirting goo in the valve, which is only a get you home fix anyway, but I have not had need to use it so far.

So do I because one disadvantage of the repair foam is that the tyre cannot normally be repaired with a plug afterwards. Use Tyreweld and you're probably writing off the tyre.
Calypso Red S2 #417

USB ElanScan interfaces - £55 incl. P&P.
User avatar
GeoffSmith
Kitty Fiddler
 
Posts: 14785
Joined: Fri 03.02.2006, 21:57
Location: S2#417 in Tytherington, Gloucestershire

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby dapinky » Tue 03.09.2019, 09:38

There are a lot of 'rules' for using the tyre plugs - some are written in law, some are physics (what will and won't work), and some are common sence.

1) they should only be used if the damage is new (or newly discovered, I suppose) - before water gets into the hole and starts to break down the tyre carcas structure.
2) only used for simple holes (ie, screw puncture etc)
3) not used on the sidewalls (too much flex during normal use to seal)
4) not used close to the sidewalls (I think it's about 5mm clearance required between the inner edge of sidewall and the plug - otherwise the mushroom head can't expand and seal properly).

I have a set in the garage, but don't carry them with me (but would if travelling in Europe). I'd rather that the RAC man looked at it, (took me to a garage if stripping the wheel is needed), and then assessed if the plug is suitable.
Dave

Just the one now, but this one's mine! - and it will be finished eventually.....

go on - click this link - you know you want to!
User avatar
dapinky
LEC Administrator
 
Posts: 8490
Joined: Sun 15.10.2006, 12:54
Location: As far west as you can get in West Wales before you become Irish (Pembroke Dock).

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby muley » Wed 04.09.2019, 07:18

While we're off topic;

A friend has a Honda Civic (yay) and he had a puncture, attempted to fix it with Tyreweld and it failed.

He called out the RAC. The technician used a bradawl to make the hole bigger(!) and used a big f*** off can of Tyreweld (or similar) and sent him on his merry way.

Tyre had to be replaced, of course

Jim
"You can take the man out of the Elan, but you can't take the Elan out of the man"
1995 Palacio S2 no 507
"LEC turbo nutter" ;)Black MX-5 NC Red Honda Integra S
User avatar
muley
Moderator
 
Posts: 4193
Joined: Tue 22.04.2003, 09:07
Location: Wokingham, Berks and Waikanae Beach

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Mon 23.09.2019, 19:00

I’ve completed 1,500 miles now. What a trip and what a car :)

Over the last few days I’ve noticed a noise from the rear axel. I’m pretty sure it’s the old familiar wheel bearing noise. The car is rock solid and stable doing 80 on the auto strata. I’ve got perhaps 2,500 miles to go :) is there anything I should consider doing before I get home? (Rude and sensible always welcome) I’ve got three days in a castle coming up so quite happy to tinker :D
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Mon 23.09.2019, 19:25

I did recently replace rear discs and pads so could it be something need tightening or adjusting?
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby John_W » Mon 23.09.2019, 20:27

To check the noise, jack up the rear and spin and wiggle the rear wheels to check for play and rumbling. If you recently replaced the bearings they might need a small adjustment.

Don’t forget to check oil, water and brake fluid. If you’re not used to long journeys in your car, especially sustained high speed, you won’t know how much oil it might go through.

Wherever you are, hope you’re having fun!

John
User avatar
John_W
Heid-bummer
 
Posts: 3780
Joined: Mon 21.04.2003, 12:31
Location: Aberdeen

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Tue 24.09.2019, 08:33

Thanks John

Bearings not been replaced in the last 5,000 miles so I’m guessing they May be on the way out. I’ll jack up the rear in the next few days and check. I did have to park the car on a ramp over the last few days so the other possibility is something to do with the pads and discs. Come to think about it the handbrake level acted strange yesterday too, it didn’t stop but went all the way down and touched the centre console.


We’re currently in a national park just south east of Modena. Went to the Enzo Museum yesterday and planning the Lambo one today followed by a visit to a castle. Having a wonderful trip. I’ve not caught up on all the details about your trip yet but I hope your issue didn’t mar the holiday too much.
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby John_W » Tue 24.09.2019, 09:29

We didn’t go to Modena (after Portofino we took the route via Brescia to Lake Garda) but our biker travelling companion spent three days there. He gave the Lambo museum top marks but the Ferrari one “must try harder” (apparently they were in the process of opening a second museum and it looked like they’d nicked all the good exhibits for it).

The injector was annoying but didn’t spoil our holiday. Not like the 6-hour traffic jam of German motorhomes and caravans in 40 degC heat going home over the Brenner Pass at the end of a public holiday or catching a chest infection! The injector was a minor annoyance!

John
User avatar
John_W
Heid-bummer
 
Posts: 3780
Joined: Mon 21.04.2003, 12:31
Location: Aberdeen

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby Fredjohn » Tue 24.09.2019, 10:21

JusNoGood wrote:Bearings not been replaced in the last 5,000 miles so I’m guessing they May be on the way out.


I would hope they would last longer than that!! However as you say they may need adjusting. At least that is relatively easy and doesn't require special tools.

Enjoy your trip: sounds like a fabulous tour. I've just returned from Spain in the company of 3 other Evoras, 2 Esprits, one Elan Sprint and an M100 after a lovely 800 mile tour of the Picos mountains. All arranged by Scenic Car Tours. Thoroughly recommend this company for organised car tours. We've now done 3: Spain, Germany and Italy. Scenic Car Tours

:burnout: :burnout:
La vie passe vite: vivez la avec elan(s).

Elan S4 DHC 1969
Elan SE turbo 1992
MB CLK 320CDi 2007
Boardman Endurance SLR 9.4 disc carbon road bike
Evora 2010
Swift Sundance Lifestyle 500
User avatar
Fredjohn
God
 
Posts: 1770
Joined: Tue 21.08.2012, 00:30
Location: Malvern, Worcs

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Tue 24.09.2019, 12:31

Fredjohn wrote:
JusNoGood wrote:Bearings not been replaced in the last 5,000 miles so I’m guessing they May be on the way out.


I would hope they would last longer than that!! However as you say they may need adjusting. At least that is relatively easy and doesn't require special tools.

Enjoy your trip: sounds like a fabulous tour. I've just returned from Spain in the company of 3 other Evoras, 2 Esprits, one Elan Sprint and an M100 after a lovely 800 mile tour of the Picos mountains. All arranged by Scenic Car Tours. Thoroughly recommend this company for organised car tours. We've now done 3: Spain, Germany and Italy. Scenic Car Tours

:burnout: :burnout:


Hehe no I didn’t mean that sorry. I’ve only had the car for 5k miles and I know I’ve not done them. I doubt the guy before me did them because he would have said. Can has only done 38k so perhaps on originals

Is there a guide on how to adjust the bearings anywhere please? Couldn’t find one on the wiki (am using my phone).
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby dapinky » Tue 24.09.2019, 15:12

Justin,

The Manual gives all the info, and all the tollerances...... but as you're away on your phone I'll paraphrase it.

Jack up the back, take wheel off.

Prise the metal cap out of the hub (flat screwdriver/chisel and work your way round the edges/lip with a tap from a hammer if needed until it is loose enough to pull off (or drops on the floor))

Use a rag to clean the black grease away from the hub nut.

You will see a split pin going through the hub stud, holding the large castelated hub nut in place.

Remove the split pin.

Use a 32mm socket (IIRC) - to undo the hub nut a bit, spin the wheel as you do so, then tighten up to 18Nm. Undo the nut 90 degrees, and tighten up until the wheel doesn't spin as easilly. Refit split pin (it will go in a couple of planes, vertical or horizontal, so you can get it in one of the 'holes' in the nut). Regrease. Put wheel back on.


However, if in doubt, jack up the car - grab the wheel at the quater-to-three position and rock it gently. Then try half-past-twelve. If there is no noticable play, and the wheel spins without any noises, it is probably good to go.

If there is any play, and you only have minimal tools, start as above, but just do the castelated nut up a bit with fingers/pliers/pipe wrench to the next position where you can fit the splitpin.

It is better to be too lose than too tight (as it expands when it gets hot, and may bind/wear out if too tight for sustained high speed driving).
Dave

Just the one now, but this one's mine! - and it will be finished eventually.....

go on - click this link - you know you want to!
User avatar
dapinky
LEC Administrator
 
Posts: 8490
Joined: Sun 15.10.2006, 12:54
Location: As far west as you can get in West Wales before you become Irish (Pembroke Dock).

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Tue 24.09.2019, 15:48

Thanks very much Dave.

Humm I don’t have a torque Wrench with me. I’m sure I can pick up some grease. I’ll see how far my adjustable opens up :)

Considering I’ve only just noticed it start making the noise do you think
It’s ok to leave until I get back? I’ll jack up the rear tomorrow and see how much play there is. It does drive straight and I’ve not noticed any waywardness, just the noise
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby dapinky » Tue 24.09.2019, 16:40

Justin,
Thinking about it, it's the front hubs which are 32mm, the back ones are a bit less (24/27??).

I would think that (unless it's totally dry in there) that there will be enough excess grease to not worry about it as a temporary thing.....

.... The torque figure is a bit irellevant, it is only used to ensure that the bearings are seated properly in the races before setting it up - if you do it too tight it can cause them to deform and/or bind..... just doing it up with a monkey wrench sideways will be fine (twist it by hand) - the adjustment is done afterwards, and is 'just enough' by finger pressure.

You may destroy the split pin when removing, but as a temporary fix, a bit of wire twisted round and through the holes will do - it's only to prevent the nut from working loose with vibration.
Dave

Just the one now, but this one's mine! - and it will be finished eventually.....

go on - click this link - you know you want to!
User avatar
dapinky
LEC Administrator
 
Posts: 8490
Joined: Sun 15.10.2006, 12:54
Location: As far west as you can get in West Wales before you become Irish (Pembroke Dock).

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Wed 25.09.2019, 08:50

Thanks Dave. Solid practice advice as always
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby JusNoGood » Wed 25.09.2019, 16:50

John_W wrote:We didn’t go to Modena (after Portofino we took the route via Brescia to Lake Garda) but our biker travelling companion spent three days there. He gave the Lambo museum top marks but the Ferrari one “must try harder” (apparently they were in the process of opening a second museum and it looked like they’d nicked all the good exhibits for it).

The injector was annoying but didn’t spoil our holiday. Not like the 6-hour traffic jam of German motorhomes and caravans in 40 degC heat going home over the Brenner Pass at the end of a public holiday or catching a chest infection! The injector was a minor annoyance!

John


Funny enough the Mrs thought the Enzo Ferrari Museum was better than the Lamborghini. Ferrari had ,ore cars, the house he was born in, loads of engines and more importantly for me a lot more classic Ferrari (more importantly for her she could get English Breakfast tea). Lambo didn't have a coffee shop, parking was wherever you could find around the industrial estate, only had a few lovely examples of their classics Espada, Muira and an early Countach and then loads of the newer angular models that dont quite do it for me. tbh I was pretty disappointed with both. I don't think they put much effort in. Both museums had small plaques for each car telling you the minimum, engine capacity, YOM and little else.

Traffic jam and chest infection doesn't sound great. I get a fair share of chest infections myself and they're never any fun.


We've been lucky with traffic. Had a few tiring days. We went, Lake Como, Lake Maggiori, Bergamo (beautiful), Verona, Mondena and now down to the south of Florence. Not sure where we'll go next. The job for the next few days is to work that one out :) The further south we go the nuttier the driving seems to get. Had quite a few scare moments with nutters weaving in and out of traffic etc.
User avatar
JusNoGood
Fanatic
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Fri 12.01.2018, 09:20
Location: Reigate, Surrey

Re: Justin's I.B.10

Postby John_W » Wed 25.09.2019, 20:07

I reckon you went to the new Ferrari museum where they put all the good stuff they’d taken from the old one my mate visited! :lol:

Dunno where you’re headed, but Siena and Lucca are not too far from Florence and are beautiful.

I am envious. We just returned from Verona a couple of days ago, to soggy damp UK :( .
User avatar
John_W
Heid-bummer
 
Posts: 3780
Joined: Mon 21.04.2003, 12:31
Location: Aberdeen

PreviousNext

Return to Projects - Other (Minor)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests