Step by Silky Step

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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby Jamie N » Tue 06.11.2018, 18:47

RonR wrote:Another small update:

May '18:
Fitted new Battery connection, Fuses and relays under the hood stowage area for seat heaters and seat back electric operation.
Porsche seats fitted after making 3-part rear brackets, finally resolving the gas strut clearance problem. Had to add a couple of washers to the outside seat brackets tilting the seats inward ever so slightly to stop the hood frame from rubbing on the seat back.
Still need to fit the seat heater switches somewhere, possibly in the centre console cubby box?
Porsche seats installed.jpg


Aug:
My wheel centres were looking a bit tired, so it was time for a refurb. Decided I like the look of black badges, so ordered up some domed ally ones from Epay to try. Removed the old badges and the outer lip from the original S2 wheel centres, the new badges (56.5mm) just overlapped the old centres but still fitted in the wheel recesses, so I Sikaflexed them on and now they're looking a whole lot better IMHO. Well worth £10.28 for 4!
Black wheel centre.jpg


Cheers,
Ron


The more I look at that interior the more I am thinking that's probably as nice as any I have seen, really liking the all black
look, (and the header / A pillar seal nicely matching the ebony suaveness :D) , lots of red in my own car which I have become a
bit bored with, I think I may have to take some clues from Silky if you don't mind Ron!. Now where was it I saw a 996 breaking ;-) .
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Mon 12.11.2018, 11:50

Wow, coming from you Jamie that's praise indeed.

Just thought I'd let you know that for the last 4 weeks my car's been sitting outside in all weathers including torrential rain and thunder storms - and not a drop got past your seals, so not only do they look good, they work! :bowdown: :cheers:

I'll try to get some photos of the modified rear seat brackets today if it stops raining.
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Mon 12.11.2018, 15:21

Rear Seat Brackets - modification to clear Gas struts:
Rear Seat Bracket.jpg


The bottom 6mm bar was bolted to the top 10mm thick bracket, the centre section was then removed, leaving enough of a gap for the gas strut to miss the bracket with the seat at it's lowest setting.

Here's the initial design viewed from the front:
Bracket Design Overview.jpg


The crystals on the carpet mean that my moisture absorber is leaking!
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Sun 26.05.2019, 19:13

May '19
Just as I arrived at the Leeds Castle "Motors at the Moat" show I saw a puff of steam from under the bonnet. For the 3rd time in a year a hose had sprung a leak.
I decided it was time to fit the Samco hose set and Coolex radiator which were ordered after the previous episode, especially with the trip to Castle Combe looming.
A fairly straight-forward job but time consuming as the renovation of the towing bracket, radiator support frame and fan cowls took 4 days alone.

old-radiator.jpg
Old radiator wasn't working at top efficiency!

ready-to-fit.jpg
Refurbed and new parts ready to fit

in-progress.jpg
Work in progress - Can you spot the deliberate mistake?

Finished the job on Thursday evening, ready for Friday drive to CC.
Long story short - Made it to CC, 3 Parade Laps and home again without losing a drop!
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby NewLogik » Mon 27.05.2019, 03:35

RonR wrote:Rear Seat Brackets - modification to clear Gas struts:
Rear Seat Bracket.jpg


The bottom 6mm bar was bolted to the top 10mm thick bracket, the centre section was then removed, leaving enough of a gap for the gas strut to miss the bracket with the seat at it's lowest setting.

Here's the initial design viewed from the front:
Bracket Design Overview.jpg


The crystals on the carpet mean that my moisture absorber is leaking!



Looking good !
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Thu 19.11.2020, 17:28

November '20

Finally got around to replacing my twisted wishbone.
Both arms are dead straight and there aren't any impact or jacking marks but it's nicely skewed:
IMG_20201119_161504-sm2.jpg

Makes me think the car might have been airborne in a previous life!

While refitting the caliper I managed to break the Banjo bolt. Ordered 2 from SJs with MOT looming next week.
Also took the opportunity to install my rebuilt 2/15 prop valves with the new O-rings, so we'll see if I got the O-ring dimensions correct!
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby esprit888 » Thu 19.11.2020, 21:15

Wondering if the car was ever on the back of a flatbed tow truck? I had a similar situation as these look a lot beefier than they are, and tow truck drivers think it's a perfect spot to ratchet down the car !
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Thu 19.11.2020, 23:24

Good call Esprit,

It hasn't been on a flatbed in my ownership, but your ratchet strap theory is much more likely seeing as the rearmost arm is accessible from the back of the car, and that's the one that's been pulled downwards.
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Mon 23.11.2020, 21:18

Had to cancel the MOT today.

Events of the last few days:

Replaced rear wishbone and prop valves - all OK.
Bled brakes - noticed LF wheel bearing is shot - wouldn't pass an MOT.
Removed hub carrier - noticed outer CV joint has excessive play.
Just for fun inspected intermediate shaft bearing - needs replacing.

Let the fun & games begin!
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Thu 03.12.2020, 18:16

Finally managed to dismantle the N/S hub, bearing and bearing carrier today with the help of a 12-ton press, split collar bearing puller, heavy duty circlip tool and a kit of mandrels.
I've had the press for a few years so was determined to put it to good use and not sub out the work, but I spent more on the other tools than it would have cost to get a local garage to do the job. :banghead:
Never mind, I'll have the right tools next time (in another 90k miles).

Looking forward to doing the off side!
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Sat 19.06.2021, 12:29

RonR wrote:Looking forward to doing the off side!

Haven't got around to doing the off side CVs yet, but now have bigger fish to fry.

The car started to idle rough on the way back from Castle Combe. Replaced plugs, HT leads and coil packs then checked and rebuilt the CAS.
On the test drive the car started chuffing steam out of the exhaust like Thomas the tank engine, so mark me down as another HGF! :(
Probably brought on by getting stuck in several traffic jams for a total of over 3 hours the day before CC, watching the rise and fall of the temperature gauge as the fans cycled on & off.

I can already feel the project creep gremlin on my shoulder - whispering "While you're in there, you might as well .................."
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby Jamie N » Sat 19.06.2021, 14:06

At least when it's done you can relax on those longer journeys in the future Ron. It's not that difficult a job actually, certain you will
manage it no problem, as you say though it's the other things that get added to the job.
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby Rambo » Sun 20.06.2021, 07:12

Jamie N wrote:At least when it's done you can relax on those longer journeys in the future Ron. It's not that difficult a job actually, certain you will
manage it no problem, as you say though it's the other things that get added to the job.


You may as well do the cambelt, water pump, alternator (rebuild with Simon's kit) full engine rebuild etc while you're at it Ron. Probably make a nice change from polishing it anyway :lol:
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Mon 21.06.2021, 11:58

Rambo wrote:You may as well do the cambelt, water pump, alternator (rebuild with Simon's kit) full engine rebuild etc while you're at it Ron. Probably make a nice change from polishing it anyway :lol:


To be honest I don't really enjoy the polishing, it's never going to be the shiniest silk red if Trevor's at the same event! :wink:

I've started looking through the spares boxes to see what I have to add to the "Project Creep" wish list, so far there's:

Cambelt, idlers, etc
Water pump
Alternator rebuild
Starter motor contacts
Intermediate drive shaft bearing, and if that's off, O/S drive shaft CV joints, and if they're off, O/S wheel bearing

Still to get:
Power steering pipes
Oil cooler pipes
Cooling fans (one of the originals started squealing when bringing the car up to "fans on" temperature when testing)

Other work:
Clean hydraulic valve lifters
Inspect exhaust manifold for cracks - seems like a common problem
Loads of de-rusting + painting, plating or powder coating

Possibles:
Bronze valve guides + seats re-cut
New injectors
New turbo cartridge (very slight movement of shaft ATM)

If I go as far as taking the engine out:
Repair sump damage
New crankshaft oil seals
De-rust block + new core plugs
Skim flywheel, new clutch, cover + bearing
Clean oil pick-up mesh
Check main + big end bearings for wear and scoring
Check cylinders and rings - light hone + new rings if required

How much of this actually gets done is down to how desperate I am to get it back on the road. :burnout:
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby Rambo » Mon 21.06.2021, 19:08

RonR wrote:
Rambo wrote:You may as well do the cambelt, water pump, alternator (rebuild with Simon's kit) full engine rebuild etc while you're at it Ron. Probably make a nice change from polishing it anyway :lol:


To be honest I don't really enjoy the polishing, it's never going to be the shiniest silk red if Trevor's at the same event! :wink:


Sorry Ron, I was actually confusing you with Mr Polish for a minute :lol: It's just that you both parked side by side at the Pit Stop. But yours looked very shiny too. And Trevor went home with no prize this year :poke:
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Sat 26.06.2021, 12:14

Just checked the ECU for stored codes before disconnecting the battery - got a code 31 which I think means sticking wastegate.
Could there be other reasons for a code 31?
If the wastegate was stuck closed maybe the overboost provided the last straw for the head gasket?

So I'm adding "Wastegate wiggle" and "Port wastegate" to the list of tasks.
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby Rambo » Sat 26.06.2021, 20:06

Ron - don't just do the wastegate wiggle with molegrips, do it properly ala Geof (only one 'effin) Smith http://wikilec.com/view/Wastegate:_Releasing

And if you need to check that the wastegate moves correctly try Flasherman Phil's approach with your old bike pump and adaptor http://forum.lotuselancentral.com/viewt ... te#p327471
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby RonR » Sat 09.10.2021, 17:58

Long story short - Due to other priorities (one of which was a daily driver diff rebuild - How can BMW say that a differential is a "non-servicable part"?) The work on the M100 has only just started.
First couple of problems are..... you've probably guessed them already - Crankshaft pulley bolt rusted on and O2 sensor won't budge!

I'm making a tool to bolt to the pulley a bit like Jim's, but the chances are I'll probably end up using the starter motor method as a last resort.
My Sealey O2 sensor socket was OK for installing the sensor but it's about 2mm too short to completely seat on the hex part for removal. I didn't notice so now I have a nicely rounded sensor. Just ordered a crow's foot socket to see if that can shift it - Last resort is to break the top off the sensor and use an ordinary 22mm socket.
Meanwhile I'm dousing the pulley bolt and O2 sensor in plus-gas every day and keeping my fingers crossed.
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby Jamie N » Sat 09.10.2021, 20:00

Another method is grind two flats on it and use a heavy duty adjustable wrench, easier if you had the exhaust removed of course, and always a bit of heat.
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Re: Step by Silky Step

Postby chrisP » Tue 19.10.2021, 17:16

Hey Ron, I'm not sure where you are with the pulley bolt, but my normal method of removal is
1/2" extension bars to clear the wheel arch
arranging an axel stand to be at the fulcrum point to take the load
a breaker bar with a 4 foot scaffold bar slid over the top - it is scary how much force is required to remove them.
Hope it works for you
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